Discovering Southern France: The Canal du Midi

Discovering Southern France: The Canal du Midi

By Sarah Franklin

I've had the privilege of spending time in the Languedoc Roussillon region of France for the past five summers and I've fallen in love. Whenever my family arrives in Toulouse, we rent a car and head out of the city and straight into the countryside. The first time I saw the fields of sunflowers alongside the road, driving towards Carcassonne, I was aghast, “gob smacked,” and overwhelmed with the visual beauty. So much so that my husband had to pull the car over; so I could be closer to these dancing heads who follow the sun like New Englanders in springtime. Then there were the vineyards. Perfectly straight corridors of chartreuse vines, lush with low hanging fruit, high cypress trees and an occasional old stone barn. The route between the Massif Central and the Pyrenees, following the Canal du Midi, had me from the start.  

A Pre-trip Extension in London

A Pre-trip Extension in London

The question often comes up of how to avoid jet lag. You can scour the internet and find various different "remedies" and "tricks" on how best to avoid jet lag after a European flight. Sometimes though, jet lag is just unavoidable. While the remedies and tricks found on the internet may be helpful in easing the symptoms and discomfort of jet lag, they are not going to solve it entirely. 

A Short Walk Along the Camino: Following the Camino de Santiago on A Pilgrim's Way

A Short Walk Along the Camino: Following the Camino de Santiago on A Pilgrim's Way

By Sarah Franklin

 

Recently I had the privilege of going on Discover Europe’s trip, A Pilgrim’s Way, that follows the Camino de Santiago, the road to Santiago, or Way of St. James. During the middle ages, to guarantee remission of their sins, pilgrims walked from many points in Europe all the way to Santiago to throw their bodies down in front of the remains of Saint James the Apostle, for redemption. Gavin Miller, our tour guide, informed us from the start, that the path of the pilgrimage actually goes back to prehistoric times when man sought the edge of the world as North West Spain was thought to be the end of the earth as its name, Finisterre, implies.